Tag Archives: Music

The Amazing Amanyea

By Marshelle Haseley

Amanyea released “Aye aye,” her debut single and video in mid- September, sending waves through Jamaica, the region and even farther. The movement inducing tune was an absolutely fantastic start to a new chapter in her journey that appears to have so much magic ahead.

photo_2018-10-24_03-54-33
All Photos courtesy of Amanyea

It is said that names are powerful, and the names that are given impact us greatly as we walk through life. Amanyea says her name has a number of meanings in various cultures. “I love my name because of the different derivatives it has in many different languages and cultures,” she explained.

Amanyea said, “I was named after a dancer, Artistic Director in Chicago Amaniyea Payne. The meaning she chose to use for her name is “Amani” means “peace” in Swahili and  ‘Yea’ is a light force, a call ‘to you’—so combined it means ‘peace to you’.”

She said her mother chose to use “Aman” which means “peace” in Hindi, and the same “Yea” as a light force— combined, her name means the same— “peace to you”.  She said, “It is something you acquire, but it’s also something you always extend ( like reciprocity with mutual respect ).”

unnamed

The artistic talent embodied by Amanyea would have been shining brightly for years leading up to the start of this new chapter in her journey. She said at this point, her mantra is  “Dawg wid too much massa sleep widout suppa.”  She explained her mantra to mean, “Don’t be afraid to give up the good for the great. And while doing so, don’t lose focus because of the opinions of too many people (masters).”

The outstanding young Jamaican dancer said she did not get time to realise she could dance. “Mommy being Dr. L’Antoinette Stines, Artistic Director of L’Acadco, I started dancing at an extremely young age,” she said. In a funny tone, she said she has yet to realise she received the gift of dance.

Singing, however, was a different process. Finding a tone which best suited her soul was a process— digging deeper to discover who she was as a musician— both as a vocalist, and a songwriter. “I realized I wanted to do it when I was 11— then I realized that I ‘needed’ do this at 18. The only thing that was stopping me was fear and opinions— hence, the mantra.”

unnamed (2)

“I received many, many years of formal training in dance. I trained with Dr. Stines at L’Acadco, Ballet Training with Elizabeth Samuda and Cathy-Ann Gibbon for Royal Academy of Dance, Cuban Moderna with Arsenio Andrade, and many more,” she said. As soon as she was inspired to begin her journey as a recording artiste she did a number of vocal training sessions, “ but not enough to say I am vocally trained,” she added. Amanyea said her vocal training sessions are important and is continuous.

Her style is unlike anything one would see walking through the city of Kingston. Her eclectic style stands out in any crowd, though she is not a physically tall person—her style and the energy she wears around it makes her seem ten feet tall. Asked about her style she said, “Travel and my background. I grew up around artistic, cultured, ‘MAD’people.” She said fortunately, she has been traveling before she could walk or talk.

“I love different cultures, I love traveling and I unconsciously grab from these different experiences and cultures I’ve encountered,” she said warmly. Amanyea’s mother and brothers are all lovers of music. She said they would listen to Bach, Nina Simone, Erykah Badu, Beyonce’, and then Jay Z. “It was a vibrant, colourful home that I grew up in.  I was exposed to a wide range of music from a very young age,” she said.

photo_2018-10-24_03-54-33 (4)

The uncontainable creative life force within her may be responsible for how she experiences the process of creating. She said what she enjoys most about creating is freedom. She said, “I enjoy the freedom of my mind. I get to express in so many different ways, freely, uncensored and comfortably.  I get to freely be myself.”

Many artists say they experience a depth which seems almost like an out-of-body experience when immersed in their craft, but she said she views the concept a little differently. “For me, it’s the other way around. Being immersed in my craft is a ‘reality’ for me. I don’t feel lost, I actually feel like I have found ‘Om’— ultimate consciousness” she explained.  She said her experience is as though everything else she focused on made her lost, while her craft remains the only stable thing in her life. “I finally told myself that  4 years ago— and ever since then, I have been the most focused and ‘found’ I have ever been.”

photo_2018-10-24_03-54-33 (2)

Amanyea was asked how she maintained a powerful energy amidst challenges such as a recent injury. She said, “After going to four different specialists in the past year I finally got an MRI done. I had a flap of cartilage that needed to be shaved down. I went in for what may seem like an hour surgery tops and came out 4 hours later. Turns out I had Grade 4 Chondromalacia of the patella and the femoral sulcus.” This means Amanyea had a condition where the cartilage on the under surface of her kneecap deteriorated and softened—a condition common among young athletes.

She was also diagnosed with Osteoarthritis and Synovitis, which is the medical term for a condition where the body tissues lining the joints possess cavities—causing pain and swelling when the joint moves. For any dancer, this would feel like a nightmare.

On April 5, 2018, she said,  “I had arthroscopy surgery done, debridement and microfracture of the femoral sulcus and patella. I lost 17lbs post-surgery and after 8 weeks I started my physiotherapy journey.”

unnamed (3)

“I am going to be honest with you— I had fear, emotional pain, and I felt discouraged. I am still pushing and this is still very emotional for me. But I must say – I used my support system as much as possible. I tend to be a loner— but during this whole process I realized how much I need my friends and family,” she explained.

She said she also wanted people to get to know her on social media, “Me— not the pretty side but, me. But social Media only saw the semi-hard parts of my journey. I went through a lot more than I chose to share. I was bedridden for 6 weeks, sent to the hospital because of bad reactions to the pain medicines.

Did more than half of my painful journey without pain meds because I was afraid of the side effects.”

photo_2018-10-24_03-54-33 (3)

She said, “ If I didn’t have my friends, and my family around— I wouldn’t have made it this far. I am lucky to also have a physiotherapist who is also a friend— and especially my Mother, Dr. L’Antoinette Stines. She did everything for me, lol “bade me, feed me, everything me” – when I couldn’t myself. It’s okay to need help. I told myself I will be able to do what I love. I am lucky to have 2 loves, Music and Dance and the people around me definitely told me the same. Don’t worry, we got this.”

In wrapping up we asked Amanyea three final questions:

P: What can we look forward to from you?

A: Music. This is only the beginning of my career. I can’t wait for people to hear more of my music and see more of my art, blossom. My aim is to blend all my talents together in one. I released my single September 7th, and the feedback had made me so excited. I am grateful, that so far, people love what they hear and see. Shocking of course, because I am being vulnerable, putting my art out there for people to either love, ridicule, scorn, hate etc. But so far I am humbled at how well received it has been. So, look forward to more music and dance, but not separated anymore. 

P: Where do you visualise seeing yourself one year from now?

A: Can I tell you one year from now? lol I see myself being an artiste, just more potent.

P: What message would you give to Amanyea at 15 years old?

A: Do not be afraid. Cliché? Yes. But I was so afraid to do all the things I wanted to do, I was afraid of opinions, of being laughed at. Dancing was my comfort zone. I wish I was confident enough to sing, and write. Join clubs just for that. But I was afraid.  Fear is a hell of a thing. 

unnamed (1)

Advertisements

Simply Iconic: The Zeppelin Review

By Tricia Williamson

It’s been over a decade since Bowers & Wilkins’ first introduced the iconic Zeppelin. This wireless speaker has a stylish, unique and sleek design. I must admit at my first glance of it online, the sheer size didn’t strike me until you see its presence in person. So if you’re in the market for a compact- this is not it.

1-1-d-zeppelin-wireless-black-front
Photos courtesy of Bowers & Wilkins

Weighing in at 14lbs, a height of 188mm and width of 660mm- this juggernaut in audio is built for your home. At $699USD, it’s no walk in the penny park. Nevertheless, it is a great addition to your interior design- perfect for a large room with a high ceiling such as a living room or party space.

zeppelin_thumb_black1
Big in size, but even bigger in sound. The Zeppelin is loud and offers high quality, clear audio in its delivery. The speaker is impressive even at high volumes the bass remains powerful yet controlled. Bowers & Wilkins have always been excellent in their craftsmanship.

zeppelin_thumb_black2
As Christmas nears, and we gather for parties and gatherings with family and friends, the Zeppelin is the speaker for your party. You can wake the neighbourhood with this… But please don’t.

VMODA Crossfade II Wireless… The Stylishly Sculpted Sound

Reviewed by Tricia Williamson | Photography by Craig Harley

One of the things I love most about reviewing headphones, starts with the experience of unpacking from those brown shipping boxes. Once you get through that, what you’ll find with most luxury premium headphones is that they are packaged in big white beautifully designed square boxes (not that I am complaining). However, this experience with the VModa Crossfade II Wireless (Milano Design) was different. The signature hexagonal packaging of black and orange gets you excited at the very sight of it. While many brands will present the headphones and a bag tucked inside, your Crossfade II Wireless steps up the game a notch with a black hard shell that opens like an oyster revealing its hidden gem. This exoskeleton case is the perfect companion for this stylishly sculpted sound samurai and will always keep it well protected.

Panache Mag Apr- MagCloud13
Photography by Craig Harley

A work of art of leather and metal, offering great compact fold, the Crossfade II Wireless delivers sound quality that is excellent, crisp and clear. It has an immersive soundstage, with sculpted bass and nicely balanced sound. It is a top contender among premium options and is a fun headphone for audiophiles. After listening for a few hours, while lying in bed, I am a fan of the ergonomic steel flex headband. The fit is close but not bothersome, and the memory foam cushions are soft on the ears. It is heavier, in comparison to the Bowers & Wilkins PX which we reviewed in the last issue.

 

There is no active noise cancellation, which is a modern feature I have come to love in premium headphones. Nevertheless, there was good noise isolation. This Crossfade II Wireless is also a wired hybrid. In the wired mode, the sound quality is very good. That said, my only issue is that I would prefer volume controls on the Speak Easy Mic Cable (included) because while in wired mode the controls on the headphones disable and you are forced to adjust on your phone/device. When in wireless mode though, the ease of button use is a breeze. Plus pairing with my Samsung Note 8 was a walk in the park.

rosegold
Photos courtesy of VMODA

Lastly, with a 14-hour battery life, you won’t need to charge for a few days. All in all, the Crossfade II Wireless is a cool, stylish choice for audiophiles looking for great headphones without the fuss.

XFBT2_rosegold1
————————————–
The VMODA Crossfade Wireless II Headphones are available online ($330USD) at v-moda.com
————————————–

PANACHE Magazine authentically reviews products we think our readers will love. PANACHE has no affiliate partnerships with any company featured in the magazine nor does it receive a share of the revenue from any purchase. We’re just giving you an honest review and leave the rest to you!

The One & Only… DJ Courtney

Photography by DJ Courtney

In everyone’s life, there is always that one person who can affect your whole mood or reset your day with just one touch. When DJ Courtney puts his hand to the music he does just that.
Courtney can transform the dullest of spaces and places in minutes with the pulsating selection he plays. Beyond the impressive collection of tracks from the 70s, 80s and 90s genre that pull a more mature audience to places like Ribbiz on their ‘Big People Sundays’. DJ Courtney is first a great Dad- NOTHING means more to him than his son. This devoted father is many things…a realist and lover of the simple things in life. So after years of waiting, we’re happy he’s decided to share a little more about the man behind the music.

 

Where did your love of music come from? My mom died when I was four years old and my dad always had music playing in the house, it was always associated with happiness.

What inspired or motivated you to get into this business? I was an avid collector of Dancehall cassettes & eventually started to go to dances, where I met Selector Webba, who encouraged me to try it based on my knowledge of music.

photo_2017-08-15_22-20-45

What events/parties do you do… you have a strong following at Ribbiz’s Big People Sundays and several top locales across Jamaica… When and where can people find you?Yes, I am in the regular rotation at Big People Sundays at Ribbiz and once a month at Pulse for Pepperseed Wednesdays. Other than that I play at various parties, weddings, events across the island. Follow me on IG @djcourtneyjm for up to date info.

Outside of DJing/Spinning…you ever thought about producing? I’ve assisted in music production in the past, but the music business is too much politics in Jamaica, so I decided not to, the less stress the better.

photo_2017-08-16_10-21-38

What attracts you most to the genres of music you spin…70s, 80s, 90s…? It’s less violent & more fun, simple.

What are thoughts on the music industry today? While there are works of a few producers in the industry today that I do enjoy, I typically find the genre too violent, which is why I prefer the oldies.

 

The Chef #RealMenCook

“My favourite cuisine is Jamaican, then Chinese, & I actually love to replicate every good cuisine that I’ve tried. My favourite dish is curried goat.” -DJ Courtney

You’re an IT guy… let’s touch on that a bit… tell us what are your thoughts on net neutrality and more importantly how has social media helped or hindered you? Net Neutrality is the best thing to happen, especially in JA, it has made us more accessible globally, as for SM, Twitter & IG are my favourites to showcase my views & promotions.

Now back to music- How important is that connection with the crowd when you play? That’s the hardest part of playing, every crowd is different, & you have to figure out how to bring the different personalities together through the music, that’s called the art of reading the crowd.

Three tunes you could not live without? Dennis Brown – Love & Hate; Sam Cooke – A Change is Gonna Come; Jimmy Cliff – Many Rivers To Cross

If you could have a sound clash with anyone who would it be? Squingy – Bass Odyssey (RIP)

If you could meet anyone dead or alive who would it be and why? Dead – Martin Luther King; Alive – Barack Obama

Finally, what’s been your greatest achievement in life? My Son. |P

DJC Mag GIF

Contact Info for bookings:
DJ Courtney™
Jamaican DJ versatile in all genres #WhoIsHere
Instagram: @djcourtneyjm
Twitter: @djcourtneyjm
Email: djcourtney@live.com